The Banggai Triangle

July 10, 2012 in Project Updates, Slideshow, The Expedition

Dr. Matthew L. Wittenrich, Ph.D. and a local fisher at Bone Baru village in the Banggai Islands discuss the Banggai cardinalfish fishery while consulting a chart

Dr. Matthew L. Wittenrich, Ph.D. and a local fisher at Bone Baru village in the Banggai Islands discuss the Banggai cardinalfish fishery while consulting a chart

The Banggai cardinalfish is a unique fish for many reasons, not the least of which is the extremely restricted geographic range this species has historically occupied. This is a fact the Banggai Rescue international science team saw firsthand today as we travelled by speedboat from our field headquarters in Bone Baru village in the north of the Banggai Archipelago to Bone Bone village in the southeast, Toropot village in the southwest, and then back to Bone Baru.

“Within the Coral Triangle, recognized as a global priority for conservation, lies a much smaller, lesser known triangle,” remarks Banggai Rescue international science team member Dr. Matthew Wittenrich, Ph.D., as our boat completes the last leg of what he has just coined ‘the Banggai triangle.’

“Marked by three not-so-distant villages, the Banggai triangle is incredibly important in the future conservation of Pterapogon kauderni,” muses Wittenrich, who points out the area contained by the Banggai Triangle encompasses an area smaller than the footprint of an average US county. “The Banggai triangle holds more than seventy percent of the world’s population of wild Banggai cardinalfish.”

As our boat alters course slightly to quarter a building swell, the late afternoon light bathes the interior of the cabin in a golden hue. Although tired from a full day on (and in) the water, the fact we just covered the bulk of the Banggai cardinalfish fishery in a single day is not lost on any of us. Given that the geographic extent of the fishery is fairly consistent with the geographic extent of the fish’s endemic range, the potential impact of the fishery on the species is profound. This is especially the case given the lack of effective fishery management, the level of illegal fishing we have observed, and what we have seen in the way of collateral damage to appropriate Banggai cardinalfish habitat secondary to destructive fishing practices (e.g., blast fishing and cyanide fishing).

Local children look on as Dr. Matthew L. Wittenrich, Ph.D. photographs Banggai cardinalfish in a less-than-pristine canal running through Monsongan village in the Banggai Islands

Local children look on as Dr. Matthew L. Wittenrich, Ph.D. photographs Banggai cardinalfish in a less-than-pristine canal running through Monsongan village in the Banggai Islands

“In virtually every example I can think of where an animal is collected in high numbers,” says Wittenrich, “there is typically somewhere in the remote reaches of its native range where the species exists in a relatively ‘natural’ state. The Banggai cardinalfish is being exploited through the entirety of its range.”

While we are confident the samples we have collected throughout the fishery will yield concrete results that will help us better understand the species and the virus which is contributing to well-documented mortality in trade, our attempts to better understand the fishery itself by conducting interviews with fishers, fishery managers and others involved with aspects of the Banggai cardinalfish trade has, at this point, yielded more questions than answers.

Can the Banggai cardinalfish fishery in the Banggai Islands sustain current levels of fishing for the marine aquarium trade, especially given other pressures on the resource such as illegal and destructive fishing practices and land-based threats like uncontrolled clearing of native forests for agriculture? Will the recommended reduced monthly quotas proposed by local stakeholders be adopted? If the quotas are adopted, will the resources be available to enforce those quotas? Are the recommended quotas consistent with what the science shows to be sustainable harvest levels? What impacts has the introduction of culled, confiscated and captive bred Banggai cardinalfish had on the naturally occurring populations?

We could go on and on.

Banggai Rescue International Science Team Member Yunaldi Yahya, M.Sc. at Bone Bone Village

Banggai Rescue International Science Team Member Yunaldi Yahya, M.Sc. at Bone Bone Village

The Banggai Islands are a place of sublime beauty, and while we no doubt appreciate this splendor as we close in on the rugged magnificence of Banggai Island and the promise of another delicious dinner provided by our hosts in Bone Baru, we’d be dishonest if we did not acknowledge today has left each of us somewhat disheartened. By no means are we suggesting the Banggai cardinalfish, its fishery or the fishers and fisher communities who depend on it are a lost cause, but there is much work to do. We, the Banggai Rescue International Science Team, now more than ever feel a deep responsibility to contribute meaningfully to the ongoing dialog about this very special fish and, in turn, the aquarium trade that has, most recently, put this species on the map.

Stay tuned, as you can rest assured there is lots more to come.

To see more photos and brief updates from the team in the field, be sure to “like” the Banggai Rescue Facebook Page.

Fish Quarantine and Inspection Agency

Banggai Triangle

Banggai Rescue Kickstarter Reward Surveys Sent Out

June 18, 2012 in General Banggai Info, Kickstarter Updates, Project Updates, Slideshow, The Expedition

Dr. Roy Yanong, DMV and Dr. Tom Waltzek, VMD, Ph.D., speaking with one of their Indonesian counterparts at the Gondol Research Centre for Mariculture (GRIM) in Bali, Indonesia. Photograph by Ret Talbot.

Dr. Roy Yanong, DMV and Dr. Tom Waltzek, VMD, Ph.D., speaking with one of their Indonesian counterparts at the Gondol Research Centre for Mariculture (GRIM) in Bali, Indonesia. Photograph by Ret Talbot.

The Banggai Rescue team is in Indonesia and is headed further afield to the Banggai Islands later this week.

To all our loyal Kickstarter Backers, the time has come to collect your reward info so we can start delivering on our promises.  Our first wave of thanks and appreciation is coming in the form of a handwritten postcard sent by the expedition team during their time in Indonesia.  For those of you who backed us at higher levels, the rest of your rewards are still estimated for a September, 2012 delivery at this time.

Be sure to fill out your reward surveys completely, fully, and promptly to ensure you get everything we owe you without delay!   It takes only a minute to complete.  If you didn’t get the email from Kickstarter, please do check your spam folders and either post a comment here, shoot us a message on Kickstarter, hit up our Banggai Cardinalfish Rescue Facebook page, you name it.

Keep a lookout for updates from the entire Banggai Rescue team in the coming days and weeks as the project continues to move forward.